THE LOST BOYS

Title: Lord of the Flies Screenwriter: Peter Brook Director: Peter Brook Distribution Studio: British Lion (UK), Continental Distribution (US) Release Date: August 13, 1963 (US) Running Time: 92 minutes Synopsis: Lost of an island, young survivors of a plane crash eventually revert to savagery despite the few rational boys’ attempts to prevent that. Older and Wiser My initial plan was to watch the 90’s version of Lord of the Flies because I was being movie ageist. However, my mistake became quite apparent within the first 10 minutes of watching the movie. How’s this for an opening scene? While hearing the sounds of boys yelling, we see one boy grab the pilot by his hair and drag him to the surface. Then, a magic raft appears that the boys ride to the island, and with their arrival, they drag the nearly unconscious body of the pilot who whispers for water. When the sound of the shell brings the first assembly, Jack happily accepts the election of Ralph as chief without feeling the bitter sting of defeat. WHAT IS HAPPENING HERE?! That’s when I just had to turn it off and give the 60’s black and white a chance. I thought the …

EVERY LITTLE THING SHE DOES IS MAGIC

This post contains affiliate links, which are noted with an asterisk (*). For more information, please review our Disclosure Policy. Title: Matilda Screenwriter: Nicholas Kazan and Robin Swicord Director: Danny DeVito Distribution Studio: TriStar Pictures Release Date: August 2, 1996 (US) December 20, 1996 (UK) Running Time: 98 minutes Synopsis: A young genius named Matilda uses telekinesis to deal with her parents, who do not value education, and Agatha Trunchbull, the oppressive principal of Crunchem Hall Elementary School. American Unexceptionalism I know people in general love Matilda, but I think it’s because they saw the movie as a kid and have never read the book. I’m sorry to be the one to ruin your childhood, but Matilda is another version of an American storyteller ruining the visionary imagination of a foreign mind. (Hello OldBoy and The Ring!) If you love the movie version of Matilda, and you want to keep that love alive, then go ahead and stay in your bubble. BUT! If you want to see the magic that could have been, then please do yourself and your dying inner child a favor and pick up the book and get to devouring! Roald Dahl’s book is full of fun …

AND THEY LIVED HAPPILY EVER AFTER

This post contains affiliate links, which are noted with an asterisk (*). For more information, please review our Disclosure Policy. Title:The Notebook Screenwriter: Jan Sardi and Jeremy Leven Director: Nick Cassavetes Distribution Studio: New Line Cinema Release Date: June 25, 2004 Running Time: 124 Synopsis: A poor yet passionate young man falls in love with a rich young woman, giving her a sense of freedom, but they are soon separated because of their social differences. Love Is While I was reading The Notebook, I constantly thought about the 1 Corinthians Love is verses because it seemed that Nicholas Sparks was trying to embody that poem through Noah and Allie’s relationship. Unfortunately, that sweet and tender love did not translate to the silver screen. The movie did what they usually do with so many of these “boy meets girl” stories. They amplified the antagonism of the opposites attract and the rich girl/poor boy narrative. Instead of the sensitive old soul of the Noah we followed in the book, we are treated with the braggadocious smart aleck who seems to have mastered advanced negging at the school of pick up artistry. Then, the movie tries to sell us on the “passionate” love …

WHEN A WHITE SAVIOR MEETS A MAGICAL NEGRO

This post contains affiliate links, which are noted with an asterisk (*). For more information, please review our Disclosure Policy. Title: The Blind Side Screenwriter: John Lee Hancock Director: John Lee Hancock Distribution Studio: Warner Brothers Pictures Release Date: November 20, 2009 Running Time: 126 minutes Synopsis: Michael Oher, a homeless black teen, has drifted in and out of the school system for years. Then Leigh Anne Tuohy and her husband, Sean, take him in. The Tuohys eventually become Michael’s legal guardians, transforming both his life and theirs. Michael’s tremendous size and protective instincts make him a formidable force on the gridiron, and with help from his new family and devoted tutor, he realizes his potential as a student and football player. Grate Expectations I haven’t read Great Expectations, but I’m going to take a page from Miss Sue’s handbook and use the little I know about the book as my analogy for this part of my tale. Although not technically an orphan, Michael is basically a boy without a home and in search of the love only a family can provide. It is true that Michael finds this with the Tuohys, but the movie does a sloppy job of …

FIGHTING FÜHRER FEVER

This post contains affiliate links, which are noted with an asterisk (*). For more information, please review our Disclosure Policy. Title: The Book Thief Screenwriter: Michael Petroni Director: Brian Percival Distribution Studio: 20th Century Fox Release Date: November 27, 2013 Running Time: 125 minutes Synopsis: In 1938, young orphan Liesel arrives at the home of her new foster parents, Hans and Rosa. When Hans, a kindly house painter, learns that Liesel cannot read, he teaches the child the wonders of the written language. Liesel grows to love books, even rescuing one from a Nazi bonfire. Though Liesel’s new family barely scrape by, their situation becomes even more precarious when they secretly shelter a Jewish boy whose father once save Hans’ life. Bro, Did You Even Read? If you read the book review, then you know that I was not a fan of The Book Thief. However, I have to say that the movie got almost everything wrong. It makes me wonder, did we even read the same book? Liesel’s relationships with all the people that mattered to her most, Papa, Rudy, and Max, were forced and unbelievable. The movie totally missed every initial encounter that was the foundation of each …